Why we fear change!

Album cover of Lost in Space Original Televisi...Loss of control. We may not be able to direct, guide or lead in the manner we are most comfortable with.

 

 

Uncertainty. We can’t see the future.

 

Surprise, surprise! We may not be ready for something unexpected.

 

 

Everything seems different. Our environment changes

 

Loss of face. It feels like other people make the decision that we are at fault or we are not capable. We become embarrassed.

 

Concerns about competence. Can I do it?

 

More work. There are only 28 hours a week. Where do I find more time?

 

Ripple effects. Like tossing a pebble into a pond, change creates ripples, reaching distant spots in ever-widening circles.

 

Past resentments. We don’t let past behaviors go.

 

Sometimes the threat is real. Change is resisted because it can hurt, it can sit the team backwards.

 

As leader work to relieve the discomfort for your team.

 

5 Questions to Help Your Employees Find Their Inner Purpose – HBR

5 Questions to Help Your Employees Find Their Inner Purpose

How can leaders help employees find meaning at work?

Organizations spend considerable resources on corporate values and mission statements, but even the most inspiring of these — from Volvo’s commitment to safety to Facebook’s desire to connect people — tend to fade into the background during the daily bustle of the work day.

What workers really need, to feel engaged in and satisfied by their jobs, is an inner sense of purpose. As Deloitte found in a 2016 study, people feel loyal to companies that support their own career and life ambitions — in other words, what’s meaningful to them. And, although that research focused on millennials, in the decade I’ve spent coaching seasoned executives, I’ve found that it’s a common attitude across generations. No matter one’s level, industry or career, we all need to find a personal sense of meaning in what we do.

Making Work More Meaningful

Leaders can foster this inner sense of purpose — what matters right now, in each individual’s life and career — with simple conversation. One technique is action identification theory, which posits that there are many levels of description for any action. For example, right now I’m writing this article. At a low level, I’m typing words into a keyboard. At a high level, I’m creating better leaders. When leaders walk employees up this ladder, they can help them find meaning in even the most mundane tasks.

Regular check-ins that use five areas of inquiry are another way to help employees explore and call out their inner purpose. Leaders can ask:

What are you good at doing? Which work activities require less effort? What do you take on because you believe you’re the best person to do it? What have you gotten noticed for throughout your career? The idea here is to help people identify their strengths and open possibilities from there.

What do you enjoy? In a typical workweek, what do you look forward to doing? What do you see on your calendar that energizes you? If you could design your job with no restrictions, how would you spend your time? These questions help people find or rediscover what they love about work.

What feels most useful? Which work outcomes make you most proud? Which of your tasks are most critical to the team or organization? What are the highest priorities for your life and how does your work fit in? This line of inquiry highlights the inherent value of certain work.

What creates a sense of forward momentum? What are you learning that you’ll use in the future? What do you envision for yourself next? How’s your work today getting you closer to what you want for yourself? The goal here is to show how today’s work helps them advance toward future goals.

How do you relate to others? Which working partnerships are best for you? What would an office of your favorite people look like? How does your work enhance your family and social connections? These questions encourage people to think about and foster relationships that make work more meaningful.

It’s not easy to guide others toward purpose, but these strategies can help.


Kristi Hedges is a senior leadership coach who specializes in executive communications and the author of The Inspiration Code: How the Best Leaders Energize People Every Day and The Power of Presence: Unlock Your Potential to Influence and Engage OthersShe’s the president of The Hedges Company and a faculty member in Georgetown University’s Institute for Transformational Leadership.

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2 Minute Thought – Wandering Mind

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One of the biggest challenges all new Leaders have is to learn how to delegate tasks and projects to their team.  Most new Leaders find themselves challenged by the concept of giving up control over the process. Often new leaders feel like they can do it better, faster. Some leaders, even feel guilty asking people to take on a project or task. Even after a new Leader understands why they should delegate they still may not have the knowledge or the confidence to execute the delegation process.

 


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2 Minute Thoughts – Wandering Mind

English: Wandering Thoughts

Self – Control

Self Control (film)

Self Control (film) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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Self-control

To control a Nation or Kingdom is easier than controlling yourself.  The power to control yourself begins with you taking your responsibilities. Responsibilities for you.  Work to control your “Monkey Mind.”  The part of you that tells you that you do not feel like doing the extra work needed for success.  The part of you that says that you should not try new things or find a fresh way of believing.

The power to control yourself begins with you taking your responsibilities to heart. You are responsible for you.  Work to control your “Monkey Mind.”  The part of you that tells you that you do not feel like doing the extra work needed for success.  The part of you that says that you should not try new things or find a fresh way of believing.

Self – Control will lead you to Mastery over the world. Control over your creation.

 

 

3 Thought Provoking Paradigm Shifts for Leaders.

A true leader moves beyond “my idea” to “our idea.”

Being a Leader

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 You can’t assume culture.

When faced with a setback, look beyond the point of impact.

 Shifts of thinking that are necessary to become a great leader from Coach Mike Krzyzewski

Mike Krzyzewski, head basketball coach of Duke...

Mike Krzyzewski, head basketball coach of Duke University,

Free Delegation Checklist

 

You Are What You Tweet – From Wharton Business School

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New research from the University of Pennsylvania attempts to understand the personality traits of Americans and the well-being of the communities they live in, by studying what they tweet. In studying a mind-boggling volume of 37 billion tweets, the researchers at the World Well-Being Project have created an interactive map of U.S. counties with scores […]

Team Building, What Does This Say About You as A Leader?

http://www.forbes.com/sites/lizryan/2016/09/22/the-ugly-truth-about-team-building/#2615a122597a

I used to get dragged into team-building activities, and I never felt comfortable. I was always watching the clock and eyeing the exit. I like to chill with people, but I never got into team-building exercises. Years later, I know why.

 

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Team-building exercises are pointless and even insulting to your team members because they suggest that if only your team members spent more time doing silly things and solving group problems together, climbing trees and rolling around on the floor, they would work more effectively together the rest of the time.

The fallacy is that the problem you as a leader must solve has anything to do with your teammates! It doesn’t. When a team hasn’t gelled and isn’t communicating, it’s not because they need team-building training. It’s because there is an energetic blockage in the mix and no one is talking about it.

That’s the elephant in the room, and it’s a leadership problem 100% of the time. An entire industry has sprung up around the made-up and juvenile idea of forcible team-building, all to prevent leaders from having to look in the mirror and take responsibility for the culture and communication on their teams.

No one ever hired a consultant to put on a team-building workshop when there were no problems! We only think about team-building when the team isn’t working together well. That’s a leadership problem.

It doesn’t mean that the team’s leader is unequipped for the job, but it means that the conversation has to begin with the question “Why is the energy blocked on this team, and why hasn’t the topic been aired yet?” rather than with the question “Should we take everybody to the arcade or take them to the ropes course in the woods, in order to do some team-building?”

Here are the principal energy blockers I see in corporations and not-for-profits, startups and government agencies:

• Fuzzy or missing strategy

• Unaddressed conflict

• Role confusion

• Red tape bureaucracy

• Slow processes requiring multiple approvals

• Over-reliance on measurement and quantitative goals

• Little to no conversation about culture, norms, energy, conflict or feelings

• Inexperienced leaders

• Little focus on experimentation, collaboration and innovation, and

• Lack of praise, acknowledgment and information-sharing

Being a leader means diving into conversations about sticky topics, rather than dancing around them and taking the team out for ice cream instead. Strong leaders can talk about icky, sticky topics. Weak leaders can’t. They organize fake-fun activities as a thank-you to their teammates for having the courtesy to keep quiet about the fake that the emperor has no clothes.

If you have to take your team off-site to play games because you can’t stand to talk about what’s happening in your office, what does that say about you as a leader?

Being a Leader

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