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Help Leaders “Be Better Than They Have Been”

We are looking for a few great Independent Sales Reps that understand that value of helping Supervisor, Managers and Leaders “Be More Than They Have Been.”  As an Independent Sales Representative, you will make a difference with each company you work with by raising the bar of leadership for all involved. You will be helping bring skills, techniques, and resources to the table.

If you are willing to help Leaders “Be More Than They Have Been.” Your compensation will be solid. Your ability to make a difference will be powerful.

For details, please review our http://touchstonepublishers.com/independent-sales-representative/

After your review, please set an appointment by clicking here

 

 

2 Minute Thought – Wandering Mind

Schedule a discovery call to see how a fully customized workshop would benefit your organization. https://freebusy.io/glenn.daniels@touchstonepublishers.com

One of the biggest challenges all new Leaders have is to learn how to delegate tasks and projects to their team.  Most new Leaders find themselves challenged by the concept of giving up control over the process. Often new leaders feel like they can do it better, faster. Some leaders, even feel guilty asking people to take on a project or task. Even after a new Leader understands why they should delegate they still may not have the knowledge or the confidence to execute the delegation process.

 


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2 Minute Thoughts – Wandering Mind

English: Wandering Thoughts

Self – Control

Self Control (film)
Self Control (film) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
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Schedule a discovery call to see how a fully customized workshop would benefit your organization. https://freebusy.io/glenn.daniels@touchstonepublishers.com

Self-control

To control a Nation or Kingdom is easier than controlling yourself.  The power to control yourself begins with you taking your responsibilities. Responsibilities for you.  Work to control your “Monkey Mind.”  The part of you that tells you that you do not feel like doing the extra work needed for success.  The part of you that says that you should not try new things or find a fresh way of believing.

The power to control yourself begins with you taking your responsibilities to heart. You are responsible for you.  Work to control your “Monkey Mind.”  The part of you that tells you that you do not feel like doing the extra work needed for success.  The part of you that says that you should not try new things or find a fresh way of believing.

Self – Control will lead you to Mastery over the world. Control over your creation.

 

 

3 Thought Provoking Paradigm Shifts for Leaders.

A true leader moves beyond “my idea” to “our idea.”

Being a Leader
Schedule a discovery call to see how a fully customized workshop would benefit your organization. https://freebusy.io/glenn.daniels@touchstonepublishers.com

 You can’t assume culture.

When faced with a setback, look beyond the point of impact.

 Shifts of thinking that are necessary to become a great leader from Coach Mike Krzyzewski

Mike Krzyzewski, head basketball coach of Duke...
Mike Krzyzewski, head basketball coach of Duke University,

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You Are What You Tweet – From Wharton Business School

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New research from the University of Pennsylvania attempts to understand the personality traits of Americans and the well-being of the communities they live in, by studying what they tweet. In studying a mind-boggling volume of 37 billion tweets, the researchers at the World Well-Being Project have created an interactive map of U.S. counties with scores for each on select well-being indicators. The project has been busy: A year ago, it tracked heart disease trends based on a billion tweets, and is now working on projects in Spain, Mexico and the U.K., and is in the early stages of a project in China.

The work of the World Well-Being Project could find business applications – for example, insurers could use the data when trying to price stress factors or risky behavior in their premiums, and real estate companies could use it to understand their markets better. But it also could help reveal aspects of communities, such as in health care, that present opportunities for timely intervention by policy makers and governments, said Johannes Eichstaedt, a data scientist and University of Pennsylvania postdoctoral fellow in psychology. He co-founded the World Well-Being Project with Penn psychology professor Martin Seligman in 2011.

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Eichstaedt discussed the far-reaching implications of the project’s research on the Knowledge@Wharton radio show on SiriusXM channel 111. (Listen to the podcast at the top of this page.)

Below are some key takeaways from the discussion:
Dimensions of Well-being

The objective of the World Well-Being Project is “to get a fairly nuanced assessment of what people’s lives are like without ever having to ask them,” said Eichstaedt, drawing comparisons with conventional survey methods. “We are piggy-backing on the larger trends of the last 15 years in artificial intelligence, machine learning and pattern recognition to sift through the [37 billion] tweets, find language patterns that are indicative of certain emotional and cognitive states and combine them into a larger-scale estimates of what these communities are like.” The dimensions of well-being that the researchers measured included life satisfaction, emotional happiness and also stress. The research process involves geo-tagging each tweet by county.

Improving by Measuring

Knowledge@Wharton High School

Eichstaedt says tracking well-being will eventually lead to improved happiness for the people who are being studied. “You can only improve what you measure,” he said. “If you … do your measurement well enough, you unleash natural market forces, because well-being is desirable: People want to be happy, they want to live with happy people, people who do well.”

Well-being is often a key element that business owners or CEOs consider when deciding where to locate or where to expand. Insights derived from the World Well-Being Project could make those determinations easier, and could also convince policy-makers to take action that would address factors that could be dragging down their communities’ well-being scores, Eichstaedt says.

Finding the Right Data

Taken in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in April ...
Jon Huntsman Hall, home of the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

The project’s early admirers were academics and scientists, such as behavioral economists who realized “that all these variables are incredibly hard to measure for communities, and we might have a method here where we can do this for the first time,” said Eichstaedt.

But how can researchers pinpoint the optimal type or volume of data needed to take accurate measurements? “It is a nuanced question to think through what is the right level of [data] aggregation and the right level of analysis to measure psychological states and to think about policy,” he said. For starters, the county level or zip code level might be the right size where a change in a particular neighborhood could be measured, he added.
Although such research could be done using posts from other social media sites, such as Facebook and Instagram, tweets are the best fit, said Eichstaedt. “It is public, so it is very easy to mass-collect, [and] you don’t need to secure consent from individuals, which means you don’t have to recruit them or pay them,” he added. He noted that it’s easier to derive and track meaning from text rather than images.

The Business Case for Well-being

Information about community well-being has a number of real-world potential business applications, Eichstaedt noted. For one, the real estate industry could use it to assess the desirability of different neighborhoods – and, in the future, even determine community health at the block level. Eichstaedt said it’s already possible to use overlays in ArcGIS – a geographic information system that combines maps with other data – to see that his own close neighbors “use laptops and drink a lot of lattes.”

As for uses in the future, Eichstaedt wondered about the possibilities for political analysis. “We see what is it in communities that makes people stressed, that makes people happy, that makes people satisfied” – all of which could factor in when they decide whom to vote for or which political party to support, he said.
“There will come a time when everything you write in shared digital spaces will be part of these market forces.”
The larger applications of such research depend on the incentives, or “who cares and for what reason,” he said. For example, in a state that is covered entirely by one health insurer – meaning there is no competition — information about people’s stress levels “becomes actionable, because you have somebody who cares that the stress doesn’t turn into smoking, diabetes or heart disease,” he explained. “The more you have a policy framework around [the data] that rewards people for doing something about it, the more this will be used for something better.”

Wrongful Uses and Protections

Eichstaedt recalled last year’s scandal involving the U.K. insurer Admiral trying to use Facebook-derived personality estimates in the pricing of its insurance. “So, if I know that you are neurotic, that you have problems with impulse control, that you are risk-seeking or reward-seeking, I’d like to take that into account in pricing my insurance to you,” he said. Admiral was forced to pull the plans following a media and public outcry.
“But there will come a time when everything you write in shared digital spaces will be part of these market forces,” Eichstaedt predicted. He called for “21st century data ownership” and “digital privacy frameworks” that establish an individual’s ownership of the information gleaned from his or her data.

Would you like to have a fully customized workshop for your organization? Click here to arrange a free discovery call.

https://freebusy.io/glenn.daniels@touchstonepublishers.com

Knowledge@Wharton. (2017). You Are What You Tweet: Using Social Media to Assess Well-being – Knowledge@Wharton. [online] Available at: http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/the-well-being-map/ [Accessed 9 Aug. 2017].

Team Building, What Does This Say About You as A Leader?

http://www.forbes.com/sites/lizryan/2016/09/22/the-ugly-truth-about-team-building/#2615a122597a

I used to get dragged into team-building activities, and I never felt comfortable. I was always watching the clock and eyeing the exit. I like to chill with people, but I never got into team-building exercises. Years later, I know why.

 

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Team-building exercises are pointless and even insulting to your team members because they suggest that if only your team members spent more time doing silly things and solving group problems together, climbing trees and rolling around on the floor, they would work more effectively together the rest of the time.

The fallacy is that the problem you as a leader must solve has anything to do with your teammates! It doesn’t. When a team hasn’t gelled and isn’t communicating, it’s not because they need team-building training. It’s because there is an energetic blockage in the mix and no one is talking about it.

That’s the elephant in the room, and it’s a leadership problem 100% of the time. An entire industry has sprung up around the made-up and juvenile idea of forcible team-building, all to prevent leaders from having to look in the mirror and take responsibility for the culture and communication on their teams.

No one ever hired a consultant to put on a team-building workshop when there were no problems! We only think about team-building when the team isn’t working together well. That’s a leadership problem.

It doesn’t mean that the team’s leader is unequipped for the job, but it means that the conversation has to begin with the question “Why is the energy blocked on this team, and why hasn’t the topic been aired yet?” rather than with the question “Should we take everybody to the arcade or take them to the ropes course in the woods, in order to do some team-building?”

Here are the principal energy blockers I see in corporations and not-for-profits, startups and government agencies:

• Fuzzy or missing strategy

• Unaddressed conflict

• Role confusion

• Red tape bureaucracy

• Slow processes requiring multiple approvals

• Over-reliance on measurement and quantitative goals

• Little to no conversation about culture, norms, energy, conflict or feelings

• Inexperienced leaders

• Little focus on experimentation, collaboration and innovation, and

• Lack of praise, acknowledgment and information-sharing

Being a leader means diving into conversations about sticky topics, rather than dancing around them and taking the team out for ice cream instead. Strong leaders can talk about icky, sticky topics. Weak leaders can’t. They organize fake-fun activities as a thank-you to their teammates for having the courtesy to keep quiet about the fake that the emperor has no clothes.

If you have to take your team off-site to play games because you can’t stand to talk about what’s happening in your office, what does that say about you as a leader?

Being a Leader
Schedule a discovery call to see how a fully customized workshop would benefit your organization. https://freebusy.io/glenn.daniels@touchstonepublishers.com

Are You Getting Enough Quiet Time?

Clipped from: https://hbr.org/2017/03/the-busier-you-are-the-more-you-need-quiet-time

Executive Summary

Taking time for silence restores the nervous system, helps sustain energy, and conditions our minds to be more adaptive and responsive. For example, silence is associated with the development of new cells in the hippocampus, the key brain region associated with learning and memory. But cultivating silence isn’t just about getting respite from the distractions of office chatter or tweets.  Real sustained silence, the kind that facilitates clear and creative thinking, and quiets inner chatter as well as outer. Try going on a media fast, sitting silently for 2 minutes during the middle of your workday, or taking a long walk in the woods — with no phone. The world is getting louder, but silence is still accessible.

 

In a recent interview with Vox’s Ezra Klein, journalist and author Ta-Nehisi Coates argued that serious thinkers and writers should get off Twitter.

It wasn’t a critique of the 140-character medium or even the quality of the social media discourse in the age of fake news.

It was a call to get beyond the noise.

For Coates, generating good ideas and quality work products requires something all too rare in modern life: quiet.

He’s in good company.  Author JK Rowling, biographer Walter Isaacson, and psychiatrist Carl Jung have all had disciplined practices for managing the information flow and cultivating periods of deep silence. Ray DalioBill George, California Governor Jerry Brown, and Ohio Congressman Tim Ryan have also described structured periods of silence as important factors in their success.

Recent studies are showing that taking time for silence restores the nervous system, helps sustain energy, and conditions our minds to be more adaptive and responsive to the complex environments in which so many of us now live, work, and lead. Duke Medical School’s Imke Kirste recently found that silence is associated with the development of new cells in the hippocampus, the key brain region associated with learning and memory. Physician Luciano Bernardi found that two-minutes of silence inserted between musical pieces proved more stabilizing to cardiovascular and respiratory systems than even the music categorized as “relaxing.” And a 2013 study in the Journal of Environmental Psychology, based on a survey of 43,000 workers, concluded that the disadvantages of noise and distraction associated with open office plans outweighed anticipated, but still unproven, benefits like increasing morale and productivity boosts from unplanned interactions.

But cultivating silence isn’t just about getting respite from the distractions of office chatter or tweets.  Real sustained silence, the kind that facilitates clear and creative thinking, quiets inner chatter as well as outer.

This kind of silence is about resting the mental reflexes that habitually protect a reputation or promote a point of view. It’s about taking a temporary break from one of life’s most basic responsibilities: Having to think of what to say.

Cultivating silence, as Hal Gregersen writes in a recent HBR article, “increase[s] your chances of encountering novel ideas and information and discerning weak signals.” When we’re constantly fixated on the verbal agenda—what to say next, what to write next, what to tweet next—it’s tough to make room for truly different perspectives or radically new ideas. It’s hard to drop into deeper modes of listening and attention. And it’s in those deeper modes of attention that truly novel ideas are found.

Even incredibly busy people can cultivate periods of sustained quiet time. Here are four practical ideas:

1) Punctuate meetings with five minutes of quiet time. If you’re able to close the office door, retreat to a park bench, or find another quiet hideaway, it’s possible to hit reset by engaging in a silent practice of meditation or reflection.

2) Take a silent afternoon in nature. You need not be a rugged outdoors type to ditch the phone and go for a simple two-or-three-hour jaunt in nature. In our own experience and those of many of our clients, immersion in nature can be the clearest option for improving creative thinking capacities. Henry David Thoreau went to the woods for a reason.

3) Go on a media fast. Turn off your email for several hours or even a full day, or try “fasting” from news and entertainment. While there may still be plenty of noise around—family, conversation, city sounds—you can enjoy real benefits by resting the parts of your mind associated with unending work obligations and tracking social media or current events.

4) Take the plunge and try a meditation retreat:  Even a short retreat is arguably the most straightforward way to turn toward deeper listening and awaken intuition. The journalist Andrew Sullivan recently described his experience at a silent retreat as “the ultimate detox.” As he put it: “My breathing slowed. My brain settled…It was if my brain were moving away from the abstract and the distant toward the tangible and the near.”

The world is getting louder.  But silence is still accessible—it just takes commitment and creativity to cultivate it.

Schedule One on One
Schedule a discover call to see how a fully customized workshop would benefit your organization. https://freebusy.io/glenn.daniels@touchstonepublishers.com

Delegation – The Key

Schedule a qualifying call to see how a fully customized workshop would benefit your organization. https://freebusy.io/glenn.daniels@touchstonepublishers.com

Clipped from: https://hbr.org/2017/03/the-busier-you-are-the-more-you-need-quiet-time

Executive Summary

Taking time for silence restores the nervous system, helps sustain energy, and conditions our minds to be more adaptive and responsive. For example, silence is associated with the development of new cells in the hippocampus, the key brain region associated with learning and memory. But cultivating silence isn’t just about getting respite from the distractions of office chatter or tweets.  Real sustained silence, the kind that facilitates clear and creative thinking, and quiets inner chatter as well as outer. Try going on a media fast, sitting silently for 2 minutes during the middle of your workday, or taking a long walk in the woods — with no phone. The world is getting louder, but silence is still accessible.

 

In a recent interview with Vox’s Ezra Klein, journalist and author Ta-Nehisi Coates argued that serious thinkers and writers should get off Twitter.

It wasn’t a critique of the 140-character medium or even the quality of the social media discourse in the age of fake news.

It was a call to get beyond the noise.

For Coates, generating good ideas and quality work products requires something all too rare in modern life: quiet.

He’s in good company.  Author JK Rowling, biographer Walter Isaacson, and psychiatrist Carl Jung have all had disciplined practices for managing the information flow and cultivating periods of deep silence. Ray DalioBill George, California Governor Jerry Brown, and Ohio Congressman Tim Ryan have also described structured periods of silence as important factors in their success.

Recent studies are showing that taking time for silence restores the nervous system, helps sustain energy, and conditions our minds to be more adaptive and responsive to the complex environments in which so many of us now live, work, and lead. Duke Medical School’s Imke Kirste recently found that silence is associated with the development of new cells in the hippocampus, the key brain region associated with learning and memory. Physician Luciano Bernardi found that two-minutes of silence inserted between musical pieces proved more stabilizing to cardiovascular and respiratory systems than even the music categorized as “relaxing.” And a 2013 study in the Journal of Environmental Psychology, based on a survey of 43,000 workers, concluded that the disadvantages of noise and distraction associated with open office plans outweighed anticipated, but still unproven, benefits like increasing morale and productivity boosts from unplanned interactions.

But cultivating silence isn’t just about getting respite from the distractions of office chatter or tweets.  Real sustained silence, the kind that facilitates clear and creative thinking, quiets inner chatter as well as outer.

This kind of silence is about resting the mental reflexes that habitually protect a reputation or promote a point of view. It’s about taking a temporary break from one of life’s most basic responsibilities: Having to think of what to say.

Cultivating silence, as Hal Gregersen writes in a recent HBR article, “increase[s] your chances of encountering novel ideas and information and discerning weak signals.” When we’re constantly fixated on the verbal agenda—what to say next, what to write next, what to tweet next—it’s tough to make room for truly different perspectives or radically new ideas. It’s hard to drop into deeper modes of listening and attention. And it’s in those deeper modes of attention that truly novel ideas are found.

Even incredibly busy people can cultivate periods of sustained quiet time. Here are four practical ideas:

1) Punctuate meetings with five minutes of quiet time. If you’re able to close the office door, retreat to a park bench, or find another quiet hideaway, it’s possible to hit reset by engaging in a silent practice of meditation or reflection.

2) Take a silent afternoon in nature. You need not be a rugged outdoors type to ditch the phone and go for a simple two-or-three-hour jaunt in nature. In our own experience and those of many of our clients, immersion in nature can be the clearest option for improving creative thinking capacities. Henry David Thoreau went to the woods for a reason.

3) Go on a media fast. Turn off your email for several hours or even a full day, or try “fasting” from news and entertainment. While there may still be plenty of noise around—family, conversation, city sounds—you can enjoy real benefits by resting the parts of your mind associated with unending work obligations and tracking social media or current events.

4) Take the plunge and try a meditation retreat:  Even a short retreat is arguably the most straightforward way to turn toward deeper listening and awaken intuition. The journalist Andrew Sullivan recently described his experience at a silent retreat as “the ultimate detox.” As he put it: “My breathing slowed. My brain settled…It was if my brain were moving away from the abstract and the distant toward the tangible and the near.”

The world is getting louder.  But silence is still accessible—it just takes commitment and creativity to cultivate it.